post brexit doom

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
24 messages Options
12
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

post brexit doom

bellend
The UK economy grew by 0.6% in the three months to the end of June, as economic growth accelerated in the run-up to the vote to leave the EU.

Second-quarter gross domestic product grew faster than expected, up from 0.4% growth in the previous quarter, the Office for National Statistics said.
If we learn from our mistakes, why aint I a genius, If you educate the masses where's the advantage for the few?

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: post brexit doom

bellend
During talks with Italian counterpart Matteo Renzi, the UK PM suggested she favoured bespoke arrangements rather than replicating those used by others.

"I think we should develop the model that suits the UK and EU," she said.

Mr Renzi said the EU vote was sad but he hoped "some good would come of it".

He said it was "important to have a vision and precise timeline for the process" but added that it would be a "message against democracy" if the consequences people voted for in the referendum didn't happen.
If we learn from our mistakes, why aint I a genius, If you educate the masses where's the advantage for the few?

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: post brexit doom

Percy
In reply to this post by bellend
Ah but only a few days of post brexitt data it will be many weeks befoe we get the real data and the plague of frogs.
Revolutions are always verbose.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: post brexit doom

bellend
In reply to this post by bellend
It appears that concerns over the stability of Italian banks could be having a role to play in the poor performance of European markets. Trading in shares of Monte dei Paschi di Siena was suspended this morning after taking another tumble.

Its shares have shed three-quarters of their value this year and is now valued at less than a tenth of its book value.

Eurozone political leaders remain unsupportive of Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi’s desire to use deploy state funds and inject about €40 billion into the banking system.

EU rules require creditors and not taxpayers to pay for the rescue of troubled banks
If we learn from our mistakes, why aint I a genius, If you educate the masses where's the advantage for the few?

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: post brexit doom

bellend
FTSE 100 hits one-year high and FTSE 250 erases post-Brexit losses as UK economy grows by 0.6pc
If we learn from our mistakes, why aint I a genius, If you educate the masses where's the advantage for the few?

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: post brexit doom

bellend
The financial Armageddon that many in the Remain camp prophesied as a direct threat to would be Leave voters, was a scary prospect. Project Fear indeed.

Yet despite a brief FTSE wobble, now recovered and a watering down of some stocks that were probably overvalued anyway, the gates of financial hell do not seem to have opened. Even the Chancellor (now ex-Chancellor as I write this) has had a vole face on his predictions for higher unemployment, increased interest rates, UK company headquarters being ceremoniously boarded up and transferred box by box to Hamburg; empty bank vaults… that sort of thing. In fact, the pro-European political elite that told us stories of impending meltdown should we dare to extricate ourselves from Brussels, have all now relented and decided that it’s all ok after all. Nothing but nothing bad has happened.

So, to the property market. The Treasury explained that we would see ‘falls in house prices of 18%’. Buyers would suddenly disappear. Sellers would retreat en masse never to venture to sell again. And mortgage companies would spite us all.

The truth is, four weeks on, that the estate agency industry is reporting business as usual. Unless they operate in a posh London area above £5m where, as has been the case for over a year, the market is waning. Here at eMoov, we are listing properties at the same rate as usual. Viewings are at a high level and our sales are at an all time high. Fall out from the Brexit vote on the Friday after the night before then resulted in less than 1% of our pipeline of 860 sales falling through in the next two weeks.
If we learn from our mistakes, why aint I a genius, If you educate the masses where's the advantage for the few?

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: post brexit doom

Ho-Hum
Funny thing, my life's not changed a bit.  Mind you, the REMAIN camp haven't unleashed the fiery dragons in the sky....Bring it on!

Refugees do not have the right to demand but should accept the blessings bestowed upon them gracefully by nations extending the hand of friendship.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: post brexit doom

dalek1
Remain said food prices would go through the roof.
Cant say I've noticed any difference.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: post brexit doom

bellend
A major pharmaceutical firm is to invest £110m developing its operations at its site in Angus.

GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) is to build a state of the art production facility at Montrose to manufacture respiratory medicines.

The company said it would support employment at the site, which currently has 450 staff, and could lead to new job opportunities.

Most of the medicines are destined for the export market.

The Montrose announcement is part of a £275m investment by GSK to expand three UK sites.

The company will also develop facilities at Barnard Castle in County Durham and Ware in Hertfordshire.
If we learn from our mistakes, why aint I a genius, If you educate the masses where's the advantage for the few?

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: post brexit doom

dalek1
Lovely news especially as its a big kick in the what not's for Sturgeon and her English hating cronies.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: post brexit doom

bellend
This post was updated on .
WHERE ARE WE NOW....

the micks have us where they want us

the northern micks have us by the short and curleys

the jocks want the same deal as the northern micks

the taffs say we will have some of that please

the frogs are loving the situation may has put us in

the crouts still run the shambles

and we will now agree to anything, we will end up paying just as much as before, still obeying all the rules, and no say in any rule changes.

we all see this coming especially Cameron.

trade with the rest of the world we now start negotiations at a disadvantage because we are seen as desperate.    

 
If we learn from our mistakes, why aint I a genius, If you educate the masses where's the advantage for the few?

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: post brexit doom

Ho-Hum
When Southern Ireland was not in the EU and we were did we have a border problem then?
Refugees do not have the right to demand but should accept the blessings bestowed upon them gracefully by nations extending the hand of friendship.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: post brexit doom

bellend
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/uk-politics-42228896/bamboozled-by-brexit

bbc looks like it couldn't get an English point of view to suit their little story.
If we learn from our mistakes, why aint I a genius, If you educate the masses where's the advantage for the few?

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: post brexit doom

bellend
What will Brexit mean for our bacon?
By Bella McShane
Business reporter, Jutland, Denmark
31 October 2017


The United Kingdom imports the majority of the pork products we consume, from loins to bacon. With 17 months to go until we are due to leave the European Union, how will Brexit affect our pork?
Denmark is the main supplier of the UK's imported pork. There are thousands of pig farms across the country and pork is the Danes' third most valuable export.
And it is Jutland which is the heart of Danish pig country. At one farm, Baldershave, 35,000 pigs are born every year. Soren Sondergaard's farm has been in his family for five generations and the UK is one of their biggest markets.
 
Denmark is the largest overseas supplier of pork products to the UK
"We follow it a lot, and we keep an eye on what is happening in the UK at the moment," says Mr Sondergaard.
"We hope of course we can continue to do trading together, but we have 130 markets all over the world which we will be looking to instead if it will be a hard Brexit."
The Danish port trade with the UK started 150 years ago, and now about 25% of all UK imported pork products come from Denmark.
What might happen to food exports after Brexit?
The single market has meant there are no tariffs on the food we import from this Nordic country. There have been warnings from the meat industry that if the UK adopts world trade tariffs then imported food could be more expensive.
Transport Secretary Chris Grayling said earlier this month that the UK would respond by: "Growing more here and buying more from around the world".
 
Soren Sondergaard hopes that Brexit won't significantly affect Danish pork exports to the UK
At the annual conference of the Danish pig industry, there is a positive mood about Denmark's future trading relationship with the UK. Brexit is one of the key issues on the agenda.
"The ideal situation for us would be that the UK would remain within the European Union, that unfortunately is not going to happen," says Christian Fink Hansen, from the Danish Agriculture and Food Council.
"So we hope that we will reach an agreement that will be as close as possible to the current situation."
 

Rearing pigs is big business in Denmark
Mr Hansen adds: "We have high levels of animal welfare, high veterinary standards.
"The alternatives for you would be to look to Brazil, to Canada, to the US, where they have lower standards of animal welfare."
At its facility in the Danish city of Horsens, staff at Danish Crown - the world's largest pork exporter - are preparing pork loin which will be sent to the UK to be cured and made into back bacon.
"The only thing we know is uncertainty, and the one thing we know we don't like as a business is uncertainty," says Lars Albertsen, head of exports at Danish Crown.
 

Lars Albertsen hopes that Denmark's close ties with the UK will limit the impact of Brexit on Danish pork exporters
"We don't know what the trade agreement with the UK will be, but we know there is a need for imports [in the UK].
"And we also think the affinity there is between Denmark and the UK, especially with food, will prevail. We need the UK and the UK needs us as well."
The majority of the pork exported from Denmark to the UK travels via Esbjerg on the country's west coast.
Daily shipments sail to Immingham in Lincolnshire, and currently there are not any border checks.
Authorities at the port of Esbjerg are now closely watching what is happening across the North Sea.
"The UK is one of our top five export markets for Denmark," says Jesper Bank, the chief operating officer at the port.
 
Jesper Bank says that Danish ports can cope with any extra Brexit paperwork
"The total value of our exports [to the UK] is about 10bn euros ($12bn; £9bn) a year, so obviously we are concerned about what is going to happen [with Brexit].
"Mostly our concerns are not about the practicalities of what will happen, we are quite sure that if we get administrative burdens we can sort some of those out with the technology.
"But some of our concern is what will happen in the UK. Will your economy slow down? Will the buying power of the British people slow down?".
British hauliers have warned that the possible introduction of checks for goods coming into the UK could lead to queues at both British and continental ports.
Mr Bank says that he and his team are confident about their ability to cope with the possible changes.
"We are aware that even small delays in times can have effects on ports due to custom clearance," he says.
"This will obviously create some sort of line… in this port we have the capacity to cope with that, but I'm aware that some of our colleagues in the UK will have raised this issue."

so in short no more bacon butties you silly brexit type people, the daily fare and non biased bbc statement.
If we learn from our mistakes, why aint I a genius, If you educate the masses where's the advantage for the few?

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: post brexit doom

dalek1
Denmark and Sweden will be the next ones out the door.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: post brexit doom

fred
Only needs one,then the dominos fall,I still can’t believe the bubbles voted to stay in.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: post brexit doom

MR H
In reply to this post by bellend
When the Bank of England Corporation are in full control of our credit and worthless paper money, its no wonder that our economy has growth.

QE quantitative easing; perpetrated by the Chancellor of the Exchequer Phillip Hammond is a total fraud.

These people expand and contract our supply of credit/money to benefit them.

We should imprison the crooked bankers just like Iceland did. Let the banks fail; and bring back the 'Bradbury Pound'.

Our Government gave us debt free money years ago. They could do this again. Bring it on i say.
It's not the SIZE of the dog in the fight.............it's the size of the FIGHT in the dog that counts.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: post brexit doom

bellend
Concerns about the shift in Poland triggered calls to limit access to EU funds for countries disrespecting the democratic rule of law. At a ministerial meeting on Nov. 15 in Brussels, the issue was raised during a discussion about the 2021-2028 budget by countries including Germany, France and the Nordic states, according to two EU officials with knowledge of the matter.
Poland’s refusal to take in mainly Muslim refugees was referred last week to the European Court of Justice along with Hungary and the Czech Republic.
“There is a growing feeling in Brussels that solidarity cannot be a one-way street, and that it becomes difficult to justify the 10 billion-euro per year net transfers for a country that is increasingly at odds with the bloc’s values,” said Bruno Dethomas, a senior policy adviser at GPLUS consultancy in Brussels and a former EU ambassador to Poland. “It is high time the EU reacted, or it risks losing its soul.”
If we learn from our mistakes, why aint I a genius, If you educate the masses where's the advantage for the few?

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: post brexit doom

Phil Wailing
Britain will not pay its agreed £39 billion bill to leave the European Union if a trade deal cannot be agreed, Theresa May has told her MPs.

She also said there will not be a snap election.
We haven't inherited the earth from our parents, we have borrowed it from our children.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: post brexit doom

fred
And Tony Benn told us we would not need a gas meter as gas would be free.....
Politics are like football transfers all speculation until someone signs on the dotted line.
12