Queen's Hospital.

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
285 messages Options
1 ... 12131415
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Queen's Hospital.

fred
First of all “there by the grace of god go I” touch wood. There are a couple of things the government can do,1 Add up the PFI acrosss all the trusts and then share the cost across the board equally,which in the absence of my solution which would be to sit these leeches down and renegotiate the terms of the contracts,in the event of their unwillingness to do so I would get up and tell them to do one,usually concentrates peoples minds to get an agreement.
2 Address the staffing levels of Trust managements there is a few bob to be saved on getting rid of deadwood managers managing even more managers all on band 6 and above as I’ve said on here before the fat in the NHS makes Humpty Dumpty look anorexic.
Just an anecdote that may be of interest,when we was in and out of Queens with my Wife’s Mum,I went to check our motor in the disabled car park at 5-45ish one morning,was sat in the car listening to the news by 6-15 most of the disabled bays had been taken by staff....,,
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Queen's Hospital.

confused of hornchurch

NHS figures reveal long delays at Queen’s Hospital this winter
PUBLISHED: 12:12 11 January 2018
Ralph Blackburn & April Roach  Romford Recorder
 
In December, 885 of the trust's patients had to spend between half an hour and an hour waiting in an ambulance at hospital, before they could be transferred to the emergency department. Picture: Paul Bennett
Ambulances were forced to wait up to an hour at A&E 990 times last month, with emergency patients stranded inside the vehicles waiting to be admitted.
 
Ambulances were forced to wait up to an hour at A&E 885 times last month, with emergency patients stranded inside the vehicles waiting to be admitted.
The NHS has released statistics concerning Barking, Havering And Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust (BHRUT) as part of a special series which highlights the winter pressures facing the health service.
The figures show that in December, 885 of the trust’s patients had to spend between half an hour and an hour waiting in an ambulance at hospital, before they could be transferred to the emergency department.
And 49 were stuck in ambulances for more than 60 minutes.
NHS England’s target time is up to 15 minutes.
The waits, known as handover delays, can be due to ambulance queues or slow processing at hospitals, and can have the knock-on effect of delaying paramedics being despatched to future emergencies.
In total 21.2% of all patients arriving by ambulances at hospital were delayed by between 30 and 60 minutes.
In the week from Christmas to New Year’s Eve there were 276 delays of between 30 and 60 minutes, and 36 incidents where patients were waiting for more than an hour.
Friday, December 29, was the worst day for delays, with 63 patients stranded in ambulances for between 30 and 60 minutes.
The Department of Health said ambulance crews should be able to hand patients over to A&E staff within the 15-minute target time.
It said not doing so increases the risk to patients due to delays in diagnosis and treatment, as well as the chance that a patient will get worse while waiting on a trolley.
The figures are likely to cause concern as doctors and hospital leaders have claimed the current NHS winter crisis is the worst in decades.
All non-urgent operations have been moved to after January 31 to free up beds and staff.
Romford MP Andrew Rosindell said: “I am very disappointed to hear that far too many patients are experiencing delays with their local ambulance services. My office was contacted by a constituent who had to wait over two hours to receive care as she injured herself whilst shopping.
“I know that the staff at BHRUT are doing an amazing job at improving providing care for local people. I will be speaking to Matthew Hopkins, chief executive of the trust, to see what prompt actions are being taken to resolve the situation.”
Andy Walker from the Save King George Hospital A&E campaign told the Recorder: “We’ve got more patients because of the growing population, but we’ve also got an unfair deal at our hospitals to manage this, because of cuts to emergency beds.
“There are consequences to the taking away of this emergency capacity. It’s clear that it’s impacting the system and that we need to make good on the cuts to beds at King George Hospital.”
Shelagh Smith, acting chief operating officer at BHRUT said: “We receive more patients in ambulances than almost any other trust in London. In December we saw over 6,000 ambulances, that’s around 200 a day and nearly ten an hour.
“As an outer London hospital, and a trauma centre, we also service two ambulance services, London Ambulance and the East of England, so we have demand from both directions.
“We regret any delay to patients and we apologise to any patient kept waiting. Our top priority is providing safe care, and we have been pleased with positive feedback from recent visits by NHS England and NHS improvement.
“These figures show how important it is for everyone to think really carefully this winter about how to stay well, and to be aware of all the good local care options.”
Emergency medicine consultant Dr Adrian Boyle, chairman for quality at the Royal College of Emergency Medicine, said: “Everybody is struggling at the moment.
He told Press Association: “Every type 1 emergency department that I know of is under serious and sustained pressure.”
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Queen's Hospital.

confused of hornchurch

Just to avoid any confusion....

Queen’s Hospital A&E entrance moved
PUBLISHED: 15:02 11 January 2018
Matthew Clemenson  Romford Recorder.
 
Queen's Hospital, flagship hospital of the Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust.
As of this week, the entrance to the emergency department at Queen’s Hospital has moved.
 
The hospital in Rom Valley Way, Romford, has moved the entrance to its Accident and Emergency department closer to the hospital’s main entrance, in front of the drop-off point instead of behind it.
The new entrance, which officially opened on Wednesday, is now next to the hospital’s maternity entrance.
The move of less than a minute’s walk was required as the hospital opened its new Enhanced Urgent Care Centre (EUCC) at 9am on Wednesday.
The emergency drop off point will remain in the same place.
A spokesman for the Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals Trust, which runs the hospital, said: “The opening of our EUCC is part of our on-going plans to improve urgent and emergency care at our hospitals.”
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Queen's Hospital.

confused of hornchurch

Hospital trust runs up £80m medical blunder bill
PUBLISHED: 09:08 16 January 2018 | UPDATED: 09:08 16 January 2018
Alex Shaw Romford Recorder
 
Queen's and King George Hospital are both run by the trust. Picture credit: Archant.
Medical failings stretching back more than two decades cost the NHS trust running Queen’s Hospital millions of pounds a year.
 
Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust shelled out nearly £80 million to victims of blunders over the past five years – the tenth highest payout of all NHS trusts.
Research by the Romford Recorder, in partnership with the BBC, found medical negligence claims cost the NHS a whopping £6.2 billion between 2012 and 2017, a third of which went on legal fees.
Experts warn pressures on the health service will only increase as lawsuits eat away at public funds.
The health service’s negligence claims bill has quadrupled in 10 years to £1.6bn in 2016-17, with a Public Accounts Committee inquiry warning in November it risks “spiralling out of control without effective action”.
The government is proposing a cap on the fees claimants can recover in low-value cases, a move Peter Walsh of Action Against Medical Accidents says “will make it impossible for some would-be claimants to find a solicitor prepared to take on the case”.
Figures from NHS Litigation Authority, which deals with claims for NHS trusts, show the trust’s payout pot was £19.4m in 2016-17, up £6.2m from the previous year.
Damages amounted to £12.9m of this sum, with £1.1m in defence costs and £5.4m in claimant costs.
Incidents that occurred before April 1995, which the Department of Health pays for under its Existing Liabilities Scheme, racked up a further bill for nearly £865,000 from 2012-13 to the last financial year.
The bill for historical errors is made up completely from hospital mistakes during childbirth.
“We treat hundreds of thousands of patients every year and while we do our utmost to provide the best possible quality of care to every patient, on some occasions, things can go wrong,” said the trust’s chief nurse, Kathryn Halford.
“We understand this has an impact on the patient and their family, and we are extremely sorry when we do not live up to our own high standards of care.”
The trust has increased the number of midwives in the maternity department and incident reporting across its hospitals, as well as introducing weekly patient safety meetings and roles such as maternity support worker, she added.
A Department of Health spokeswoman said: “Our relentless drive to improve patient safety [...] will help to reduce traumatic and costly safety failings in the NHS and ensure better protection for patients.
“We’re ensuring taxpayers’ money is spent effectively by taking action against law firms creaming off excessive legal costs that dwarf the damages recovered – but we’re also clear we want to ensure patients continue to access justice at a reasonable cost.”
Rising life expectancy and a “change to the court discount rate” had increased costs resulting from historic claims, said an NHS Resolution spokesman.
“From April 1, this changed and NHS Resolution is now involved right from the start in order to improve the support for families and the healthcare staff involved in these rare but tragic incidents and to speed up resolution,” he added.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Queen's Hospital.

Percy
The cost is ramped up because they never admit liability and appeal every time they lose up to the highest courts in Europe.That is why their costs are so high the lawyers are laughing all the way to the bank.
Revolutions are always verbose.
1 ... 12131415