Queen's Hospital.

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Re: Queen's Hospital.

bellend
so it's better than the worse examples?
If we learn from our mistakes, why aint I a genius, If you educate the masses where's the advantage for the few?

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Re: Queen's Hospital.

Percy.
I can only speak as I find when I needed the hospital it was there and I got good service.My wife got good service after her private Brentwood hospital nearly poisoned her.I take elderly and disabled to hospital usually for tests or ulcerated legs and the service is excellent. I have no complaints. Barts now that is a whole other story.
“The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool.”




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Re: Queen's Hospital.

confused of hornchurch
In reply to this post by Percy.

" every body have a bar code tattooed on them so records can be obtained instantly".

I seem to remember such a project, it was implemented during the holocaust.
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Re: Queen's Hospital.

bellend
my lickle dogie is chipped who is next?
If we learn from our mistakes, why aint I a genius, If you educate the masses where's the advantage for the few?

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Re: Queen's Hospital.

Percy.
In reply to this post by confused of hornchurch
Indeed a very far sighted project they must have foreseen computerised records.Mind you German records do not go missing and are well kept.
“The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool.”




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Re: Queen's Hospital.

Phil Wailing
In 1945 my brother in laws father made sure millions of German records went missing.
We haven't inherited the earth from our parents, we have borrowed it from our children.
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Re: Queen's Hospital.

confused of hornchurch
In reply to this post by Percy.

"Mind you German records do not go missing"

The records don't, but the people that instigated the atrocities tried their hardest to remain anonymous.
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Re: Queen's Hospital.

confused of hornchurch

EXCLUSIVE: Trust which runs Queen’s Hospital collects £6million from parking charges in five years

07:00 14 November 2014

by Beth Wyatt (Romford Recorder)

The trust which runs Queen’s Hospital has raked in more than £6million from car parking charges over the past five years, new figures show.

Parking income for the Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust (BHRUT) has jumped from £1,002,630.34 in 2009/10 to £1,452,807.68.

Between the years 2012/13 and 2013/14, the sum increased by more than £180,000.

The figures, obtained in a Freedom of Information request (FoI), show the total income of car parking charges across both Queen’s Hospital, in Rom Valley Way, Romford, and King George Hospital, in Goodmayes, Redbridge.

The Recorder previously reported on patients who have been hit with fines for failing to buy parking tickets when visiting Queen’s Hospital A&E and when a meeting overran by 10 minutes.

A former employee of the trust, who did not wish to be named, said: “The prices are quite steep, because you can have a long wait for your appointment and sometimes you are then told to come back again another day.

“It needs to be reasonable.

“Staff also have to pay a lot of parking and, as an ex-worker, I don’t see why we should do that.”

Jackie Nugent, BHRUT’s director of estates and facilities, said charges were in line with local council-run car parks and neighbouring hospital trusts.

A stay of less than an hour for patients and visitors costs £1.20 at both hospitals, while visits of one to two hours cost £2.40.

The three to six hours option costs £4.80 and the highest charge is £18 for more than 12 hours.

The car park at Queen’s is run by a private finance partner on behalf of BHRUT, but the tariffs are set by the trust.

The figures do not include the income from Havering Council’s car park at the old ice rink.

Ian Buckmaster, the director of Healthwatch Havering, said: “We have no position on this, but there needs to be a balance between the people who are legitimately visiting and the people who are just using it as a car park because it is walking distance from the station.

“But there is a permit system [concessions] for certain people and that seems a reasonable approach.”

Ms Nugent said the trust strived to be as “compassionate as possible,” by offering more free disabled parking than is required and free parking to cancer patients, women in labour and families of terminally ill patients.

She added: “Funds raised from car parking are used to support hospital services and improve patient care.”
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Re: Queen's Hospital.

confused of hornchurch

24 per cent of outpatient calls to Queen’s and King George ‘do not get answered’

07:00 03 December 2014  (Romford Recorder)

One in four outpatient calls to Queen’s and King George hospitals do not get answered.

Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust (BHRUT) said the figure, up 28 per cent since mid-July when an improvement scheme was launched, was “still not good enough”.

Chief executive Matthew Hopkins said: “We know how frustrating it can be for our patients when they try and call us to change their appointments,” adding: “We will continue to focus on this area to improve the overall patient experience.”

About 15 per cent of patients do not attend their outpatient appointments at the two hospitals run by BHRUT, he added.

The figure came in an update published by the trust on improvement since it was placed in special measures by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) 12 months ago.
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Re: Queen's Hospital.

confused of hornchurch

Threefold rise in ambulances queuing more than 30mins outside Queen’s and King George A&Es

13:07 24 December 2014

Sebastian Mann  (Romford Recorder)

Hundreds more patients are being made to wait more than 30 minutes in ambulances queued outside A&Es at Queen’s and King George, according to new figures.

Three times as many ambulances spent at least half an hour stacked outside the hospitals in one month this winter as did during the same period last year, the London Ambulance Service (LAS) statistics show.

The London Assembly Labour Group, which obtained the figures, said they showed the system was “fast descending into crisis”. In response, the London Assembly Tory Group said things would have been worse under Labour.

Between November 3 and December 7 this year, 315 ambulances had to wait more than 30 minutes outside the Romford and Goodmayes hospitals.

From November 4 to December 8 last year, that figure was just 90, and during a period of the same length in the previous, 120 ambulances were made to wait.

LAS’s assistant director of operations Michael Pearce said more patients in serious and life threatening conditions were been dealt with than last year and added the service was campaigning to tackle a shortage of paramedics in the UK.

He went on: “Residents in Barking and Dagenham, Havering and Redbridge can help us by only calling us in a genuine emergency.”

Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust, which runs Queen’s and King George, said attendances at Queen’s A&E had risen 16 per cent year-on-year. Chief operating officer Sarah Tedford said: “The sheer numbers we are seeing means that some people are having to wait far longer than we would like in our A&Es.”

Labour’s Tom Copley AM said: “[The government] needs to realise that without real and sustainable support for the ambulance service, it is London’s patients who will continue to suffer.” But Tory AM Andrew Boff said: “It is lucky that the government didn’t decide to follow the Labour Party’s advice and cut health funding rather than protect it.”
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Re: Queen's Hospital.

confused of hornchurch

Trust behind Queen’s Hospital, Romford, pays more than £500k to suspended staff

13:53 31 December 2014

Harriet Orrell  (Romford Recorder)

Hundreds of thousands of pounds are spent every year on local NHS staff being suspended on full pay.

Figures obtained by a Freedom of Information request show Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospital Trust (BHRUT) has paid out more than half a million in salaries to suspended staff in the past three years.

In 2012 £167,935 was paid out to 21 employees while 2013 saw a dramatic increase with £207,834 paid to 20 staff members.

The figures for 2014 were obtained up until the end of September and show 20 suspended staff members have been paid a total of £194,158 so far.

With a quarter of 2014 unaccounted for this number is set to significantly exceed previous years.

Director of people and organisational development at BHRUT, Deborah Tarrant, said: “The number of suspensions needs to be related to the size and complexity of the organisation.

“As a trust with more than 6,000 employees this is not an unexpected number.”

However, numbers obtained for another acute London trust, the Royal Free NHS Foundation Trust, show only £73,744 was paid to suspended staff in 2013, just over a third of the BHRUT total for the same year.

There is also an added cost of providing cover for the suspended staff which is not illustrated by these figures.

Ms Tarrant added: “We always seek alternatives to suspension as we recognise the personal and financial impact it can have.

“However our main priority is our patients.

“When allegations have been made against an employee we have a duty of care to our patients to act to maintain quality, safe care as well as a duty to our staff members to maintain a safe working environment.”

The chief executive of the Taxpayers Alliance, Jonathan Isaby, said: “The disciplinary system has to move quicker.

“Leaving people in limbo isn’t just unfair on them but costs taxpayers a significant sum, one we simply can’t afford as a country.

“The NHS needs all of its resources on the front line, and that means choosing whether to reinstate or fire staff in a far less protracted fashion.”

During the first nine months of last year a single employee was paid £35,742 and another individual received £30,797.

It is not clear from the figures whether they were suspended on full pay for the remainder of 2014
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Re: Queen's Hospital.

Royston Eldridge
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Re: Queen's Hospital.

Romfordian
E7 Its not just public sector my old company suspended people on full pay hoping the person would leave, when they had little or no evidence of wrong doing mainly because the person would stand up for there rights. One guy was suspended for over eighteen months on full pay he wasn't that bothered, he knew he was innocent and took cash in hand work, when he came back they had to honor his holidays as well
 Mind you he was a nightmare to work with but always made sure he was in the right before he refused to do something He was suspended three times to my knowledge, Overzealous ignorant bullying managers
Not a party activist but WAS a Labour supporter
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Re: Queen's Hospital.

confused of hornchurch

 Planned chaos?

Queen’s Hospital looking for new car parks after patients stop attending over parking chaos

10:00 25 April 2015

Ralph Blackburn  

Traffic queues at Queens hospital carpark

Wheelchair bound elderly woman chooses not to attend due to the stress of finding a parking spot.

Related articles
Facebook campaign brings Havering Council apology over hospital parking fine

Parking chaos at Queen’s Hospital Romford.

Do you think Queen’s needs more car parks?

Health trust chiefs are looking at providing additional car parks after complaints about the cost and difficulty of parking at Queen’s Hospital.

Readers contacted the Recorder to speak about the difficulties they have had finding a space and the cost of parking their cars.

Gemma Brooks, 32, of Hornchurch, said she arrived half an hour before her appointment, yet was still unable to find a parking space.

Gemma ended up parking in a disabled bay so she would not miss her appointment, and was fined.

She said: “In the disability bays the cars were back to back on the yellow lines. Even the ambulances might not be able to get through.”

The Rom Valley Way hospital is run by Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals Trust (BHRUT).

There are two car parks, the official hospital car park and next to it, a public car park run by Havering Council. Both have large queues at peak times.

BHRUT’s general manager for estates and facilities, Peter Harris, said: “We are continuing to work with Havering Council to look at options for additional parking spaces at Queen’s Hospital.

“This includes investigating any potential land sales or leases available in the local area.”

In the meantime one reader, who wished to remain anonymous, said the stress of finding a space was putting her wheelchair bound mother-in-law off attending the hospital.

She said: “The cost is astronomical and it causes added stress and financial pressures to patients and their families.”

Katy Hughes, 35, from Dagenham, agreed. She said that in emergencies she chose to use taxis, instead of driving herself, as it was too difficult to park.

She said: “When you want to get to the hospital, when someone is on their last legs, the last thing you want to be thinking about is can you get a parking space, or have you got enough cash on you.”

Parking at hospitals has been a contentious issue.

In October last year, Havering Council reversed an £80 parking fine for a man who was nine minutes late to his car after attending a meeting at Queen’s about his critically ill wife. A Facebook group protesting over the fine gained more than 10,000 members.
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Re: Queen's Hospital.

Royston Eldridge
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Re: Queen's Hospital.

Romfordian
Why has it taken so long to do anything it was one of the complaints when the hospital was was in the Planning stage not enough parking for the staff secondly where are the going to find extra parking spaces suppose they could buy back the old ice rink
Not a party activist but WAS a Labour supporter
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Re: Queen's Hospital.

confused of hornchurch

You've hit the nail on the head, it all stems from bad planning.

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Re: Queen's Hospital.

Romfordian
Another amusing thing Clr Kelley Saying on page 6 Romford Recorder about people unable to see a doctor "It is a sign of the times caused by Haverings growing population"
 Yes you muppet you were instrumental in Allowing thousands of houses being given planning permission and not putting in the infrastructure to cope  
Not a party activist but WAS a Labour supporter
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Re: Queen's Hospital.

Royston Eldridge
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Re: Queen's Hospital.

confused of hornchurch

'World's safest hospital' to mentor east London trusts under plan to improve care

 Ross Lydall, Health Editor

Published: 16 July 2015

Updated: 11:04, 16 July 2015

Two east London hospitals are to be mentored by the “world’s safest hospital” as they battle to improve patient care and come out of special measures.
 
Doctors and nurses at Queen’s hospital, in Romford, and King George hospital, in Ilford, will be taught by medics from the Virginia Mason Institute under a five-year, £12.5 million partnership with the NHS unveiled today by Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt.

It is part of his initiative to reduce the 800 “avoidable” deaths each month in NHS hospitals that has set him on a collision course with the doctors’ union the British Medical Association as he vowed to force consultants to work at weekends.

The Seattle-based institute, dubbed the US’s “hospital of the decade”, will share its safety systems that include increasing bedside nursing care and using an “electronic dashboard” to ensure regular monitoring of intensive care patients. There will also be a crackdown on time-wasting practices.

Mr Hunt said: “The achievements at Virginia Mason over the past decade are truly inspirational and I’m delighted they will now help NHS staff to learn the lessons that made their hospital one of the safest in the world – patients will see real benefits as a result.”

Barking, Havering and Redbridge trust, which runs Queen’s and King George, is one of five NHS trusts to benefit from the institute’s guidance.

Two weeks ago the Care Quality Commission said the trust should remain in special measures but upgraded its status from “inadequate” to “requires improvement” after praising a new management team for “significant improvements” in the last 18 months.

Last year the trust breached the NHS four-hour A&E waiting time target for the 50th month as it continued to be blighted by a failure to recruit emergency department consultants. Massively in debt, its agency bill for stand-in staff topped £100,000 a week.

But it has hit the A&E target in five weeks over the last four months and has cleared a backlog of hundreds of serious incidents awaiting investigation.

Matthew Hopkins, chief executive of Barking, Havering and Redbridge NHS trust, said of the US partnership: “This is a real investment in us as an organisation and the population that we serve.

“I have no doubt that this work will prove invaluable, and I am proud that we will be at the forefront of an initiative which will have benefits for the NHS as a whole.”

Today the BMA said the threat to enforce seven-day contracts was a “wholesale attack on doctors” and a “blatant attempt” by the Government to distract from its “refusal to invest properly in emergency care”.

Mr Hunt has given the BMA six weeks to negotiate changes to contracts for consultants and junior doctors, with new arrangements in place by 2020.

But BMA council chairman Dr Mark Porter said it was unclear who would pay for the new contracts or how the Government would avoid fewer doctors being available during the week. Health group Patient Concern said Mr Hunt was living in a “dream world”.
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