Havering's claim to fame.

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Havering's claim to fame.

confused of hornchurch

Wednesday, Mar 29th 2017 7PM  13°C

Places where HALF the GPs are failing: Best and worst areas for seeing a doctor are revealed - so how does YOUR area fare?
In some areas almost half of GPs have are inadequate or require improvement
Elsewhere 46 per cent have been given the highest rating of outstanding
The analysis by the Health Service Journal (HSJ) looked at inspection reports 
By Sophie Borland Health Editor For The Daily Mail and Stephen Matthews For Mailonline
Published: 00:10, 29 March 2017 | Updated: 10:28, 29 March 2017

The worst areas to live for seeing a GP are today exposed by an analysis of inspection reports.
It reveals how in some parts of England almost half of all surgeries have been rated inadequate or require improvement.
Elsewhere in the country, a staggering 46 per cent of practices have been given the highest rating of outstanding.
Here, MailOnline has created a full breakdown for each NHS Clinical Commissioning Group and their practices in England. 

In some parts of England almost half of all surgeries have been rated inadequate or requires improvement (file picture)
BEST AREAS FOR GPS 
% of GPs which are outstanding
Nottingham West                            46.2%
Ashford, Kent                                   28.6% 
Rushcliffe, Nottinghamshire      27.3%
North Derbyshire                           22.9% 
North Tyneside                               19.2% 

Health bosses said the worst surgeries were clustered in areas which were extremely overcrowded and struggling to attract GPs.
These include East London and Essex where many practices are run by a single doctor nearing retirement working out of a few converted rooms of their house.
The analysis by the Health Service Journal (HSJ) looked at the inspection reports of 6,476 GP surgeries - the majority of the 7,700 in England.
WORST AREAS FOR GPS
% of GPs which are inadequate or require improvement
Havering, London                        48.4%
Waltham Forest, London           37.1%
Thurrock, Essex                            36.4%
Barking & Dagenham, Essex    34.5%
Mansfield & Ashfield, Notts.    31.8%

These had been undertaken by the Care Quality Commission watchdog and each practice has been given a rating of ‘outstanding’, ‘good’, ‘requires improvement’ or ‘inadequate.’
The HSJ then worked out which health trust – or Clinical Commissioning Group - had the highest number of poorly performing or good surgeries.
The worst is Havering in East London where a shocking 48.4 per cent of practices are either ‘inadequate’ or ‘requires improvement.’
In nearby Waltham Forest, the proportion is 37.1 per cent, while it is only marginally better in Thurrock, in Essex, at 36.4 per cent.


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4358634/Places-England-HALF-GPs-failing.html#ixzz4ck02fbPe 
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Re: Havering's claim to fame.

Phil Wailing
Why am I not surprised.
We haven't inherited the earth from our parents, we have borrowed it from our children.
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Re: Havering's claim to fame.

Ho-Hum
In reply to this post by confused of hornchurch
My GP is excellent.  If I arrive at his surgery shortly after opening at 8.AM I will be given an appt at noontime as a final patient.

Of course, I would only asked to be seen if it was urgent, which does not mean life threatening but something that would keep me waiting at a health centre or A&E for hours on end.

However, a regular appt may take a week or more.
Refugees do not have the right to demand but should accept the blessings bestowed upon them gracefully by nations extending the hand of friendship.
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Re: Havering's claim to fame.

Percy
Whilst my last GP retired and has not been replaced and my present one is getting to retirement I get excellent service last time I phoned at 9am got an appoinyment at 2pm same day .Had a long chat with him he ordered my antibiotics by computer and they were ready at the chemist as I walked home 10 minutes later.I do know a number of GPs however who are thinking of packing it in as they are at the surgery 8am and most days not home until 9pm and are now having to do weekends they are not able to keep the pace up.
Revolutions are always verbose.
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Re: Havering's claim to fame.

confused of hornchurch

The health service lost 445 full-time doctors from September to December 
It exposes the 'deepening crisis' in surgeries struggling to meet demands 
NHS boss Simon Stevens will unveil plans tomorrow to improve the service
The 'dreadful' figures have been slammed by a number of health experts 
By Sophie Borland Health Editor For The Daily Mail
Published: 00:55, 30 March 2017 | Updated: 00:56, 30 March 2017

Almost 150 GPs are quitting the NHS every month despite a government pledge to hire 5,000 by 2020.
The health service lost 445 full-time doctors in the three months from September to December, figures revealed last night.
Experts said the fall exposed the ‘deepening crisis’ in surgeries that are struggling to meet the demands of the rising, ageing population.

NHS boss Simon Stevens is expected to unveil plans tomorrow to improve the health service, including proposals for surgeries to work more closely together to provide evening and weekend appointments.
But MPs and medical professionals say these plans are ‘light years away’ as the health service is so short of GPs.
Figures from NHS Digital show there were 34,050 full-time GPs in December 2016, down from 34,495 in September 2016 – a drop of 1.3 per cent.
The data only goes back to September 2015 – before then it was collected differently – when there were 34,592 full-time GPs.

NHS boss Simon Stevens is expected to unveil plans tomorrow to improve the health service
The drop in numbers comes amid widespread demoralisation over increasing workloads and bureaucracy. Many doctors leave the NHS for private practice or jobs overseas, and some quit the profession altogether.


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-4362672/GPs-quit-NHS-rate-150-MONTH.html#ixzz4cnHviLbY 
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Re: Havering's claim to fame.

dalek1
Well I owe the Nurse Practitioner at my GP surgery my life and in the past various GP's when I was struck down with repeated Bronchitis attacks as a kid.
Now we are losing GP's and our wonderful administration aims to increase the population of the borough by circa 75,000 in the next 20 years how is our current health infrastructure going to cope?
If its creaking now it will be in meltdown by then for sure.
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Re: Havering's claim to fame.

Percy
Well increase population will soon godown if we all die quickly due to lack of GPs its a plot thats why they need a new cemetary.
Revolutions are always verbose.